• Distance:
  • 419km / 260 Mi
  • Duration:
  • 7:22:34

The Glooscap Trail is located in Northwest Nova Scotia, along the shores of the Bay of Fundy and the Minas Basin. This is a great motorcycle route with some good eats and sights along the way. The road itself has some twisties along the shore and some spectacular views of the Bay of Fundy. The route can be completed in 260 mi (419 km) and 7 1/2 hours of scenic riding. For more information on the Bay of Fundy see: http://www.bayoffundytourism.com/

The Glooscap Trail starts in Windsor 40 mi (64 km) Northwest of Halifax.

Windsor, a town of 3,800 people located at the junction of the Avon and St. Croix rivers which flow into the Minas Basin. Windsor was originally known as Pesaquid, a Mi'kmaq term meaning "junction of waters". Windsor, Nova Scotia claims to be the ‟birthplace of hockey” based on a reference in a novel by Thomas Haliburton, where kids at the King's Collegiate School would play ‟hurley” on the frozen waters on Long Pong. To his day locals still play hockey on the pond. Windsor is also home to the oldest hockey rink in Canada: the Stannus Street Rink. For more information on what to see, where to eat and where to sleep in Windsor see: http://www.town.windsor.ns.ca

Windsor is also a part of the Evangeline trail click here to see more:

Evangeline Trail, Nova Scotia is great motorcycle riding and gorgeous scenery in 191 mi (307 km)

Evangeline Trail, Nova Scotia is great motorcycle riding and gorgeous scenery in 191 mi (307 km)

The ride from Yarmouth to Mount Uniake is filled with history, beauty and most importantly a lot of twisties! This route is one of the best motorcycle routes in Nova Scotia; it longs the Southern ...

Get started riding from Windsor to Truro towards Newport on Nova Scotia Route 215 along the Southern shore of the Minas Basin. The road here is very twisty and also has a long straight-a-way.

The first stop is Truro, a town of 12,000 people located at the end of the Minas Basin. The area's original First Nations name ”Wagobagtik” comes from the Mi'kmaq name meaning "end of the water's flow", it was later shortened by Acadian settlers to ‟Cobequid” who arrived in the area in the early 1700s. Minas basin and Cobequid Bay has brown water because of a large amount of suspended silt largely due in part to the extreme tidal range, which rises up to 50 feet (15 metres) in spring.

Truro is known as the ‟Hub of Nova Scotia” because it sits at the junction of the Canadian National Railway between Montreal and Halifax and contains all the transmission lines (power and communications) for all of Nova Scotia. For more information on what to see, where to eat and where to sleep in Truro see: http://www.truro.ca

Ride from Truro to Upper Economy; leave Truro and take Nova Scotia Trunk 4 West then merge onto Trunk 2 towards Upper Economy. The road here is relatively straight with only a few turns.

The next stop is in Upper Economy, you'll find a world class cheese shop called ‟That Dutchman's Farm” open daily in July and August http://www.denhoek.ca . The shop is located at 112 Brown Road, right off the main road via a short stint of gravel. They encourage you to taste a variety of delicious cheeses made on site; try the awesome Dragon's Breath cheese, it's to die for. The farm also has an antique store and farm animals.

Ride from Upper Economy to Parrsboro, continuing West on Trunk 2. The road here is twisty with a lot of elevation along the shore.

Stop for a break in Parrsboro, a small town on the Northern Shore of Minas Basin. A great place to eat here is called the Harbour View Restaurant located at 476 Pier Road. The Harbour View is more of a dinner with good fish and chips and a nice view of the beach.

From Parrsboro to Advocate Harbour take Nova Scotia Highway 209. The road here is very twisty with elevation and again follows along the Minas Basin.

Advocate Harbour is a small rural community located on Cape d'Or, East of Cape Chignecto Provincial Park on the Bay of Fundy. A visit to the provincial park or the lighthouse at Cape d'Or offers stunning views of the Bay of Fundy.

Ride from Advocate Harbour to Amherst, continuing Northwest on Highway 209. The road here is twisty and follows along Chignecto Bay and Cumberland Basin. Once you pass through Joggins turn onto Nova Scotia Highway 242 heading East, and then merge onto Nova Scotia Highway 302 heading North to reach Amherst.

Amherst is a small town of 9,700 located on the Northeast end of the Cumberland Basin near the border to New Brunswick. Since the mid-1800s, Amherst was one of Nova Scotia's most prominent centres of business and industry. Amherst's historic position as a centre of wealth and influence is also reflected in the fact that it was the home of four of the Fathers of Canadian Confederation: Robert Barry Dickey, Jonathan McCulley, Sir Charles Tupper and Edward Barron Chandler. For more information on what to see, where to eat and where to sleep in Amherst see: http://www.amherst.ca/

Amherst is part of the Sunrise Trail. Check out the detailed motorcycle route here:

Ride the twisty Sunrise Trail along the Northumberland Strait in Nova Scotia over 229 mi (368 km)

Ride the twisty Sunrise Trail along the Northumberland Strait in Nova Scotia over 229 mi (368 km)

The Sunrise trail is a 229 mi (368 km)Â long twisty route the follows along the Southern shore of the Northumberland Strait that's not only scenic but fun to ride! There's a special welcoming fee ...

Ride from Amherst back to Parrsboro leaving Amherst on Trunk 2 heading Southeast passing through Springhill. Then continue on the Trunk 2 riding Southwest on some twisty roads to reach Parrsboro to the end of the Glooscap Trail.

The Glooscap Trail is a beautiful ride along the famous shores of the Bay of Fundy. Riding one of Nova Scotia's great motorcycle roads, this route can be completed in 260 mi (419 km) over a long 7 1/2 hours of scenic riding. The views of the rising tides of the Bay of Fundy is a sight to see, and the Glooscap Trail perfectly highlights the areas beauty. Enjoy the Ride! EatSleepRIDE.

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