JRbiker

30 days ago

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The 2024 Ninja 7 Hybrid Brings Electricity to ICE

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

For those riders who are e-motorcycle curious, but not ready to commit to a full electric motorcycle, Kawasaki provides an option for 2024 with the all-new Ninja 7 Hybrid.

Kawasaki is bringing hybrid motorcycles to the masses. Kawasaki photo

Kawasaki is bringing hybrid motorcycles to the masses. Kawasaki photo

Like all hybrids, it's a combination. In this case, it's a traditional 451cc parallel twin ICE - internal combustion engine - in the lingo of the day, with a compact traction motor. 
The traction motor is rated at 7.0 kW (max. 9.0 kW) and is powered by a 48V lithium-ion battery pack beneath the seat. In true hybrid style, the battery (around 30 lbs.) is charged while riding. 
Kawasaki has paid plenty of attention to dispersing heat from both motors. The Ninja 7 Hybrid has a pair of radiators, a liquid-cooled oil cooler, a system drawing hot air away from the rider, and ducts to keep the hybrid power system cool.

The traction motor sits behind the cylinders of the ICE. Kawasaki photo

The traction motor sits behind the cylinders of the ICE. Kawasaki photo

This bike has a trio of riding modes that take advantage of the configuration of the powerplant. Riders can choose from sport-hybrid, eco-hybrid and EV for low-speed, short distance trips. Riders can switch between modes by using buttons on the left handlebar switch cluster.  
EV mode offers a full automatic transmission with the option to personalize their shifting preference in eco-hybrid mode. EV mode limits the transmission to the first four gears and the switch from eco-hybrid to full EV must be done at less than 15 mph. 
In eco-hybrid mode, the traction motor provides the power until the engine engages at around 2,000 rpm for a seamless transition
Sport-hybrid mode lets riders control the six-speed transmission through shift buttons on the left handlebar. There is no clutch lever or shifter pedal. The hydraulic clutch is modulated by an ECU. In sport-hybrid mode riders can call upon E-boost that temporarily increases power output to match that of a 650cc bike. It's available for five seconds per use only and governed by a countdown timer. Think of it as a boost feature available in a multitude of video games.

E-boost would be handy on the highway. Kawasaki photo

E-boost would be handy on the highway. Kawasaki photo

It seems like this would be a good bike for beginners, it's got Automatic Launch Position Finder (ALPF) and a six-speed automated manual transmission. 
The ALPF automatically returns the bike to first gear when it stops. It can be deactivated for those who prefer manual control.
Other features that will likely offer ease of use, for any rider really, is a Walk mode (2 mph), with reverse. Walk mode and reverse isn't something I would expect to find on a bike of this displacement, but I guess it's to help handle the extra weight of the battery, traction motor, additional radiator, along with the longer wheelbase than you would find on a typical small sport bike. 
It's not a cutting-edge racer replica so the the Ninja 7 Hybrid ABS features a sporty, yet relaxed, riding position and a trellis frame that offers stability to match the power output while allowing riders to have fun in comfort. It's available in dealers now.

The Ninja 7 Hybrid is like two bikes in one. Kawasaki photo

The Ninja 7 Hybrid is like two bikes in one. Kawasaki photo

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