JRbiker

25 months ago

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The STILRIDE SUS1 is a Modern Take on an Ancient Art

Stockholms län, Sweden

Fold, fold, fold. A lotus blossom.

Fold, fold, fold. A crane.

Fold, fold, fold. An electric scooter.

The first two might be familiar to you if you know about origami. The latter, not so much.  It will be when you’ve finished reading this post about the STILRIDE Sport Utility Scooter One, also known as the SUS1.

Tue Beijer, left, is STILRIDE CTO and Jonas Nyvang, is CEO. STILRIDE photo

Tue Beijer, left, is STILRIDE CTO and Jonas Nyvang, is CEO. STILRIDE photo

What’s an electric scooter and the art of paper folding have in common? Lots. It’s basically how the SUS1 is constructed, only using steel sheets, robots, and the company’s proprietary technology known as LIGHT.FOLD . The company is the brainchild of co-founders Jonas Nyvang and Tue Beijer. Nyvang is the CEO while Beijer is CTO. (Geez, there are a lot of ALL-CAPS with these guys. But they’re excited, not angry. At least I hope they are, and I believe they are, because they have a lot to be excited about.)

The SUS1 is built using folded steel. STILRIDE photo

The SUS1 is built using folded steel. STILRIDE photo

The general public seems pumped about this new machine too, as more than 100,000 have signed up indicating their interest in the SUS1. They’ve generated good buzz (like an electric motor!) in the press most recently an article in Forbes Magazine. The enthusiasm and interest are not entirely unexpected, Nyvang told ESR, but not to this extent.

“We always knew we were onto something, but the global media attention has gone beyond our expectations. It’s really reassuring that other people are just as excited about the SUS1 as we are - and it’s not long now before people can get their hands on one.”

STILRIDE has adopted this manufacturing technology to address the challenges and environmental impact that comes with vehicles that are not easily recyclable, such as the hundreds of plastic components in most bikes. Then there is also the carbon footprint that is created from manufacturing motorcycles in Asia and shipping them worldwide.

Nyvang said these factors are not as much of an issue with the SUS1.

“Our technology overcomes all of these challenges. By folding sheets of steel over curves, we’re reducing the components required to build our bike by 50%. By using steel, our bike is also lighter, more durable and easier to recycle than its plastic alternatives. And we can flat pack sheets of steel and ship them around the world to be folded and fitted at a workshop near the end customer, which significantly reduces the carbon footprint of the finished product, whilst supporting local manufacturers and workshops.

The technology is particularly exciting because it can be used to design and create anything. We’re not just limited to motorbikes, although the SUS1 is the first application of our tech.”

Instead of paper, steel is folded to make the SUS1. STILRIDE photo

Instead of paper, steel is folded to make the SUS1. STILRIDE photo

These electric scooters are made from thin sheets of steel. STILRIDE photo

These electric scooters are made from thin sheets of steel. STILRIDE photo

If you think this is the bike for you, or it’s the perfect one for your spouse, cousin, or best friend, that’s the mindset the company wants you to have. They are aiming it at everyone.

“The SUS1 is ostensibly a high-end product. But despite its premium quality it has been designed to be uni-age and unisex. I imagine it being used predominantly in urban areas, by people who value good craftsmanship, high performance and clean design,” Nyvang said.

STILRIDE is looking to someday have their bikes ridden by customers across the world. There are also plans in the works to create another e-motorcycle and make their tech available.

“Next on the product side we plan to create a cargo bike and trailer. More widely, we plan to sell our software and robotics technology to other companies and manufacturers, so they can use it to create minimal-waste products that have been designed with nature in mind.”

Speaking of the future, Nyvang can picture a day that every rider will be mounted on an electric motorcycle.

“It’s certainly moving that way. Governments are increasingly under pressure to set green targets and tax those driving high-emission vehicles. And fuel prices are fluctuating massively as global events impact the markets. Motorbikes are far better than cars in terms of their emissions - and electricity is a more easily renewable source of fuel. We are definitely moving towards a fully-electric future, but exactly when we will get there I cannot say.”

If he could only tell the world one thing about the SUS1, it would be this:

“That this is so much more than just a bike. By riding the SUS1, not only are you investing in a high-performance motorbike, but you’re also investing in our vision of a future where innovation drives sustainability without compromising on style or design. And where access to tools that can drive sustainability are democratized so that we can all enjoy a healthier planet.”

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